Participate in the February 2020 Member Challenge – Technique Toolbox Courses!

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Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 138 total)
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  • #35784
    samash07
    Participant

    I’m trying to learn the harmonics but the strumming is difficult to get down. Anyone got tips?

    #35785
    brettboy
    Participant

    Happy Uke-In Everyone!
    This month I took on the Clawhammer course (but I tossed in a few harmonics at the end just for fun). The course was excellent. Thank You Christopher Davis-Shannon!

    #35786
    Andrew
    Keymaster

    @samash07 – Try a really slow strum, where it’s almost like an arpeggio. This will let you focus more on hitting the harmonic on the A string. When you get comfortable with the right hand, start to speed it up so it sounds more like a normal strum.

    @brettboy – It sounds awesome on that instrument, Brett! The only thing I can suggest is to hammer-on a little harder so that we get a more pronounced tone. Keep up the great work!

    #35787
    lisadmh
    Participant

    @brettboy, how cool with the harmonics! I love it. Great job.

    #35790
    samash07
    Participant

    Thanks @Andrew I will start doing just that to get a feel.

    #35803
    holly1
    Participant

    Alright so here’s my entry with shortening bread, actually played on my gold tone banjolele. Hope that doesn’t exclude me from possibly winning, LOL. -Holly

    #35804
    Andrew
    Keymaster

    @holly1 – Well done! You’ve got a great feel with this style 🙂 If I have to be really nit-picky, I’d say watch the tempo, as you played the first phrase (quarter note part) slower, BUT kept the rest steady at a quicker tempo. And I’d prob practice the last section (the really busy stuff) a little slower to clean it up a touch. But, again this is me grilling you, LOL. Your feel is killer!!

    #35810
    smokealot
    Participant

    For days now I have this earworm and keep whisteling shorting bread. people start starring at me…

    #35813
    lisadmh
    Participant

    I know the feeling. This happens in our household on a monthly rotation. Right now it’s People are Strange.

    #35819
    lakeside339
    Participant

    yes Holly – you are excluded from winning. 😉 Nice job and it is nice to hear the Goldtone.

    Is anyone besides me struggling to keep the claw shape? I keep wanting to either strum up after a down brush (like my fingers get caught), or shoot one finger out to hit the melody note (especially on any but the A string).
    Maybe it is just a matter of continued practice with an unfamiliar technique

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by lakeside339.
    #35821
    turkgoose
    Participant

    Here is my attempt at shortnin bread. The claw hammer is so unique, and Christopher is an excellent teacher, but I don’t think I’ll ever be able to master it. But I had fun learning it, and that’s all that matters, right?

    #35822
    Andrew
    Keymaster

    @turkgoose – sounds great overall! What I’d work on is playing it slower so you can focus on keeping the tempo steady and getting a lil more clarity in some of the notes/chords that weren’t cleanly hit.

    #35823
    katazumiri
    Participant

    Hello, I’m new here. I will try to play “Cornbread and Butterbeans”:

    .

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by katazumiri.
    #35825
    cloud_cactus
    Participant

    So I want to submit Amazing Grace, but is there an easy way to get the G string to tune low, and not go flat or sharp without buying a string?

    #35828
    robinboyd
    Participant

    @cloud_cactus – The short answer is no.

    If you look at your strings, you will notice that the lower pitched ones are thickest and the higher pitched ones are thinnest. If you take a lower pitched one and try to tune it high, it will be too tight and might snap and if you try to take a higher pitched one and tune it low, then it will be too floppy. Dedicated low G strings are either thicker than C strings or they are wound with metal wire to make them heavier without making them too thick.

    If you really don’t want to buy a new string, there is one trick that I’ve heard of but I haven’t tried. It involves taking off all the strings and using your C string as a low G, your E string as a C, your G string as an E, and leaving your A string where it is. It would be a lot of effort, though, and all of your strings would be a little bit floppy.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 138 total)
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